The online archive of global LGBTQ+ history, current events, and personal stories

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5 days ago

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3 weeks ago

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4 weeks ago

RIP Nancy Valverde
1932 - 2024
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1 month ago

Christopher Street Days, Gay Pride on May 4 in Aurich, Germany, where Karl Heinrich Ulrichs was born 199 years ago!Noch knappe 4 Wochen, dann ist es wieder soweit und wir eröffnen mit dem 9. CSD Aurich die Pride Saison in Niedersachsen!
❤🧡💛💚💙💜
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Christopher Street Days, Gay Pride on May 4 in Aurich, Germany, where Karl Heinrich Ulrichs was born 199 years ago!
1 month ago

Photos from Schwules Museum's post ... See MoreSee Less

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1 month ago

Photos from Bruce LaBruce's post ... See MoreSee Less

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2 months ago

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BirJMnMcfBs ... See MoreSee Less

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2 months ago

In the early 1960s, Dirk Bogarde made the decision to abandon his hugely successful career in commercial movies and concentrate on more complex, art house films Bogarde appeared in Basil Dearden's seminal film "Victim" (1961), the first British movie to sympathetically address the persecution of homosexuals. His career choice alienated many of his old fans, but he was no longer interested in being a commercial movie star; he was interested in developing as an actor and artist (however, that sense of finding himself as an actor did not extend to the stage. His reputation was such in 1963 that he was invited by National Theatre director Laurence Olivier to appear as "Hamlet" to open the newly built Chichester Festival Theatre. That production of the eponymous play also was intended to open the National Theatre's first season in London. Bogarde declined, and the honor went instead to Peter O'Toole, who floundered in the part).

Appearing in "Victim" was a huge career gamble. In the film, Bogarde played a married barrister who is being blackmailed over his closeted homosexuality. Rather than let the blackmail continue, and allow the perpetrators to victimize other gay men, Bogarde's character effectively sacrifices himself, specifically his marriage and his career, by bravely confessing to be gay (homosexuality was an offence in the United Kingdom until 1967, and there reportedly had been a police crackdown against homosexuals after World War II which made gay men particularly vulnerable to blackmail).

The film was not released in mainstream theaters in the US, as the Production Code Administration (PCA) refused to classify the film and most theaters would not show films that did not carry the PCA seal of approval. For himself, Bogarde was proud of the film and his participation in it, which many think stimulated public debate over homosexuality. The film undoubtedly raised the public consciousness over the egregious and unjust individual costs of anti-gay bigotry. The public attitude towards the "love that dared not speak its name" changed enough so that within six years, the 1967 Sexual Offences Act decriminalizing homosexual acts between adults passed Parliament. Bogarde reported that he received many letters praising him for playing the role. His courage in taking on such a role is even more significant in that he most likely was gay himself, and thus exposed himself to a backlash.

Bogarde always publicly denied he was a homosexual, though later in life he did confess that he and his manager, Anthony Forwood, had a long-term relationship. When Bogarde met him in 1939, Forwood was a theatrical manager, who eventually married and divorced Glynis Johns. Forwood became Bogarde's friend and subsequently his life partner, and the two moved to France together in 1968. They bought a 15th-century farmhouse near Grasse in Provence in the early 1970s, which they restored. Bogarde and Forwood lived in the house until 1983, when they returned to London so that Forwood could be treated for cancer, from which he eventually died in 1988. Bogarde nursed him in the last few months of his life. (IMDb)

Happy Birthday, Dirk Bogarde!
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2 months ago

Stella Rush (aka Sten Russell) was ahead of her time, defying the binaries (gay/straight, butch/femme) that defined the lives of women in the mid-20th century and resisting society’s expectations—marriage, kids. She took a huge risk by writing for ONE magazine while working as a civil servant at the peak of the Lavender Scare (if discovered, she would almost certainly have been fired). That’s where “Sten Russell,” Stella’s nom de plume, came in.

LISTEN to Eric’s 1989 interview with Stella: bitly.com/mgh-rush

Image: Stella Rush holding a copy of ONE magazine featuring a drawing of her as Sten Russell, during taping for the Lesbian Herstory Archives Daughters of Bilitis Video Project, San Francisco, May 15, 1987. Credit: Photo by Morgan Gwenwald © Lesbian Herstory Archives DOB Video Project, LHEF, Inc.
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2 months ago

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A short film was made called The Letter Men.

3 months ago

Voice of Transportation ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago

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3 months ago

What Is A Chapstick Lesbian ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago

9 queer films from last year to love (even if the Oscars didn’t) | Xtra Magazine ... See MoreSee Less

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3 months ago

It was just supposed to be a romantic dinner out. Deborah Johnson and Zandra Rolón Amato never set out to test anti-discrimination laws. But they did. And they won.

A friend had told them about the Papa Choux restaurant in Los Angeles. They went, but once the restaurant staff realized the women were a couple, they tried to remove them from the romantic booth they’d reserved, claiming it was against the law for them to serve two people of the same sex there. Seasoned activists as they were, Johnson and Amato fought back in court. “To summarize it quickly… Yeah, what happened. Okay, we go to court. The lower courts rule against us. The appellate court rules for us. So they have a right to petition the supreme court, which they did. When the supreme court said they weren’t going to hear it, then that meant that the next lowest level, the appellate court’s ruling was going to stand.” Their case put teeth into the local gay rights ordinance. And while it didn’t actually change California’s civil rights bill to add sexual orientation, the appellate court interpreted the law to include sexual orientation—that was big!

LISTEN: www.makinggayhistory.com/podcast/deborah-johnson-zandra-rolon-amato⁠⁠

Image: Zandra Rolón Amato (left) and Deborah Johnson, 1984. Credit: Courtesy Deborah Johnson.
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4 months ago

Black Pride congratulates Colman Domingo on his Oscar nomination for portraying Bayard Rustin! He is now the 2nd openly Gay actor to receive an Oscar nomination for playing a Gay character. ... See MoreSee Less

4 months ago

Trans Woman Duets With Her Old Voice 🎶 ... See MoreSee Less

5 months ago

Lesbian Tide (1971-1980)

From the archives of JD Doyle who has 38 copies of the periodical (see link below). An excellent publication, with a very good balance of cultural and political. It was the first lesbian publication with a national distribution in the US.
www.houstonlgbthistory.org/lesbian-tide.html
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Lesbian Tide (1971-1980)

From the archives of JD Doyle who has 38 copies of the periodical (see link below). An excellent publication, with a very good balance of cultural and political. It was the first lesbian publication with a national distribution in the US.
http://www.houstonlgbthistory.org/lesbian-tide.html
5 months ago

Timeline photosMerry Christmas from team AnOther ❤️

📸 Photography by Richards, 1937. Courtesy of Getty
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5 months ago

In the early 1950s, “people turned to psychiatrists for answers to the question of homosexuality. What causes it? What can we do about it? How can we eliminate it? So the sickness label infected everything that we said and did. And made it very difficult for us [homosexuals] to have any credibility for anything we said for ourselves.” — Barbara Gittings

Where does a person without a name for what they are, without a shared language for how they feel—where do you go to find yourself? In the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s, you headed to the library. Barbara Gittings believed strongly in the power of public libraries to support young people in search of information and a sense of belonging. Listen to Barbara and other early activists at the forefront of the campaign to depathologize homosexuality in A KIND OF MADNESS, episode one in our miniseries “Dismantling a Diagnosis,” available now wherever you get your podcasts.

LISTEN NOW: bit.ly/mgh-madness

Photo of Barbara Gittings (center) by Annette Lein, taken during the American Library Association celebration and Social Responsibilities Roundtable Award. Source:Philadelphia Gay News, July 23, 1982, via NYPL The New York Public Library
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5 months ago

1977 ... See MoreSee Less

1977
5 months ago

Have a Queer 1950s/60s Xmas!

PS: Every issue of ONE magazine is digitized and can be found on the site houstonlgbthistory.org/ONE.html
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Have a Queer 1950s/60s Xmas!

PS: Every issue of ONE magazine is digitized and can be found on the site https://houstonlgbthistory.org/ONE.html
5 months ago

In den frühen Morgenstunden des 4. Dezember 1993 verstarb der Berliner Fotograf Jürgen Baldiga (1959–1993) an den Folgen von Aids. Exakt 10 Jahre zuvor hatte er erfahren, dass er HIV-positiv ist – damals (und noch bis Mitte der 1990er Jahre) kam das einem Todesurteil gleich. Ärzte gaben ihm höchstens noch 2 Jahre. Baldiga, gelernter Koch ohne fotografische Ausbildung, begann, sein Leben und seine Umwelt mittels einer simplen Spiegelreflexkamera zu dokumentieren. In seinen Arbeiten setzte er sich intensiv mit der eigenen Erkrankung und dann auch seinem Sterben auseinander, ebenso mit schwulem Sex. Bevorzugt porträtierte er die Randständigen und Außenseiter der Gesellschaft, wurde zum Chronisten der Westberliner Szene der 1980er Jahre. Im Kosmos der „Trümmertunten“ des Kreuzberger SchwuZ fand er ein Zuhause. Beizeiten regelte Baldiga Nachlass, Beerdigung und Grab; und hartnäckig hält sich das Gerücht, er stecke selbst hinter seiner Todesanzeige, die posthum in der „taz“ erschien: „Ich bin tot.“ Mit diesen Worten endete auch sein allerletzter Tagebucheintrag kurz vor seinem Tod vor 30 Jahren.

Balidgas Nachlass wird im Archiv des Schwulen Museums aufbewahrt. Sein Vermächtnis umfasst mehr als 5.000 Fotos, rund 40 Tagebücher, unzählige Artefakte und Dokumente. Darunter besagte Todesanzeige, unser „Fundstück des Monats“. (In unserem Café ist im Dezember zudem der Farbabzug des „Autoporträts mit Clownsnase“, das der Anzeige zugrundeliegt, ausgestellt.)
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In the early hours of 4 December 1993, the photographer Jürgen Baldiga (1959-1993) died in his Berlin home as a result of AIDS. Since 1983 he knew that he was HIV-positive – at the time (and until the mid-1990s) this was tantamount to a death sentence. Doctors gave him a maximum of 2 years to live. Baldiga, trained as a chef but not as photographer, bought a simple SLR camera and began to deal intensively with his AIDS illness and his own dying. Another recurring theme of his photos was gay sex. His preference for portraits of the marginalised and of outsiders made him a chronicler of the West Berlin scene of the 1980s. The drag queens of the Kreuzberg-based SchwuZ club were at the centre of his personal universe. Baldiga took care of his estate, funeral and grave in good time; and rumour has it that he himself was behind his obituary, posthumously published in the leftist newspaper “die tageszeitung”: “I am dead”. His very last diary entry from the beginning of December 1993 ended with exactly these words.

Baldiga left 40 or so diaries, more than 5,000 photos, and countless artefacts and documents; they are stored in the archives of the Schwules Museum in Berlin. (The colour print of his “Self-portrait with clown's nose” – at the basis of this obituary – will also be on display in our café in December).

Image: Baldiga-Selbstporträt mit Clownsnase (ca. 1992), SMU
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6 months ago

OSCAR WILDE [below left] having lunch with Lord Alfred Douglas near Dieppe in 1898, after his release from Reading Gaol ... See MoreSee Less

OSCAR WILDE [below left] having lunch with Lord Alfred Douglas near Dieppe in 1898, after his release from Reading Gaol
6 months ago

The GAY-BC Book, 1966, a camp adventure....
Download it many others of its ilk at this page....
www.houstonlgbthistory.org/assorted3.html
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The GAY-BC Book, 1966, a camp adventure....
Download it many others of its ilk at this page....
http://www.houstonlgbthistory.org/assorted3.html
6 months ago

Famous last words... ... See MoreSee Less

Famous last words...
6 months ago

How Linda Hunt silenced the world after discrimination ... See MoreSee Less

6 months ago

Happy Giving Tuesday!

Please help us raise $10,000 by the end of 2023. Your generous support will empower the development of the important phase of engaging the design/tech firm who will build the Rainbopedia platform.

We're honored to include you on our journey as we work to overcome the systemic removal of LGBTQ+ visibility from global history. We’ll achieve this by providing the world with Rainbopedia, an online, open-source platform for documenting, archiving, and exploring global LGBTQ+ history, current events, and personal stories.

2023 has been a huge year for us as we've been preparing for Rainbopedia's platform development, expanding connections in the global LGBTQ+ community, and cultivating corporate sponsors and foundation partnerships. We invite you to join us in realizing this extraordinary vision. Together we’ll build a living archive of our collective LGBTQ+ history.

www.rainbopedia.org/donate
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6 months ago

When, in 1952, director Jean Negulesco asked Clifton Webb if he were a homosexual, the actor drew himself to his full height and replied, “Devout, my boy, devout.”

Photograph from Hulton-Deutsch Collection, 1955.
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When, in 1952, director Jean Negulesco asked Clifton Webb if he were a homosexual, the actor drew himself to his full height and replied, “Devout, my boy, devout.”

Photograph from Hulton-Deutsch Collection, 1955.
6 months ago

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6 months ago

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6 months ago

Remembering film historian and GLAAD co-founder Vito Russo, who died on this day in 1990. ❤️ His book The Celluloid Closet remains a foundational analysis of LGBTQ portrayals in Hollywood film. ... See MoreSee Less

7 months ago

Happy International Lesbian Day 🩷 ... See MoreSee Less

8 months ago

'It is hard to be different' ... See MoreSee Less

9 months ago

Das Schwule Museum trauert um Wolfram Setz.

Wolfram Setz, Historiker und jahrzehntelanger Aktivist, war Mitglied und Freund des Schwulen Museums. Im Laufe seiner langen Karriere hat sich Wolfram Setz vor allem für die (Wieder)Entdeckung schwuler Geschichte eingesetzt, in der von ihm seit 1991 herausgegebenen „Bibliothek Rosa Winkel“ machte er unterschiedliche Zeugnisse der Schwulenbewegung für Generationen von Leser*innen bis heute zugänglich. Eine Bibliothek kann einen Raum darstellen, der eine bessere Gesellschaft denkbar macht.

Wolfram Setz ist am 14. August 2023 im Alter von 82 Jahren verstorben. Wir wünschen den Hinterbliebenen hiermit viel Kraft.

The Schwules Museum mourns the passing of Wolfram Setz.

Wolfram Setz, historian and activist for decades, was a member and friend of the Schwules Museum. In the course of his long career, Wolfram Setz was especially committed to the (re)discovery of gay history; in the "Bibliothek Rosa Winkel" (Library Pink Triangle), which he published since 1991, he made various testimonies of the gay movement accessible to generations of readers to this day. A library can be a space that makes a better society conceivable.

Wolfram Setz passed away on August 14, 2023 at the age of 82. We hereby wish the bereaved family much strength.

Image: Schwules Museum
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