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Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

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Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

Recording LGBTQ Stories for Generations to Come

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Barbara Jordan

Jordan and President Carter, ca. 1977.Barbara Jordan’s memorial stone. She was the first African-American woman to be buried in the Texas State Cemetery, in Austin, Texas.Jordan posthumously honored by The Advocate, March 1996.As a member of the House Judiciary Committee, Jordan participated in the Watergate hearings that brought down President Richard Nixon. Her famous speech reminded her colleagues what was at stake and to follow the Constitution as they deliberated on the president’s actions.Barbara Jordan, 1976.Jordan’s diploma from Boston University School of Law, 1959.Meeting with civil rights leaders and President Lyndon Johnson (not pictured) as state senator from Texas, February 13, 1967. At left, Andy Biemillier (Legislative Director, AFL-CIO); at right, John Doar (Civil Rights Division, Department of Justice).Each year the Office of the Texas Governor gives out the Barbara Jordan Media Awards to media professionals and students who have produced material for the public which accurately and positively reports on individuals with disabilities, using People Frirst language and respectful depictions. Jordan suffered from multiple sclerosis in her later years.Barbara Jordan, first female African-American senator of Texas (1966–1972); first female African-American Representative in Congress, (1972–1979).Because of segregation, Jordan could not attend The University of Texas at Austin, and so attended Texas Southern University an historically black institution. She graduated magna cum laude in 1956.Barbara Jordan, the first black woman elected to Congress from the South, at the height of her Congressional career, 1976.The Barbara Jordan forever stamp was released by the United States Postal Service, the 34th stamp in the Black Heritage series.